STUDY TIPS

  • Select what you are going to revise – Make a plan that includes 3x 15-20 minute sessions for each subject per week – it is better to revise a subject 3 times a week for shorter periods than once a week for a long period
  • Create lots of ‘starts’ to your study sessions – this means working in 20 minute blocks – Memory is at it’s peak a few minutes after we stop learning – this is called reminiscence – Frequent breaks increases the number of reminiscence breaks and prepares the brain to take in new information
  • Review your learning from the day by looking at your notes and transforming them into cue cards with memory triggers. Highlight key words
  • Display key words, details in your room – this will help you remember
  • Form a study group and discuss, teach one another topics, concepts
  • Remember the brain likes ritual so study for a particular subject at the same time and in the same place each week
  • Buy a whiteboard and use it to test yourself
  • Get past exam questions and practice them – Look for patterns, key words
  • Be active with your study – speak it out loud, draw it, turn it into a diagram/flowchart – anything that transforms your information
  • Use different colour pens/highlighters when creating notes – this will help your memory
  • Write/create your own questions to test yourself
  • Remember zero time learning – This means place a cue card with information somewhere where you walk past it often – each time you do, glance at it – read it – you’d be surprised how many times you will revisit it
  • Turn your notes from the lesson into a mindmap or reduce it to the 5 most important points – reducing information helps you to sort through and consolidate your learning
  • Plan nutritionally for a study session – do you know you burn calories while you study? Make sure you have protein before a session and eat some slow release carbs during your session
  • Redo one question from a test – ask your teacher to remark it – or redo your worst paragraph from a test essay
  • Build up your speed writing – computers diminish the speed of your handwriting – practice handwriting answers to questions or test essays
  • Study on the move – moving around the room helps the memory
  • Make connections – ask yourself – How does this new material connect to what I learned last week?
  • Overlearning is the best thing you can do. This means using the information to practice lots of different questions. This means you will be able to work flexibly with it during the exam
  • Reward yourself
  • Start before tea-time –even if it is something small - then you will not be motivated by guilt
  • Make use of short spells pf time on buses, tea breaks and the like. Break the work into smaller pieces. Always carry some with you on cue cards. Carry an exam question in your head and scribble down ideas even in odd moments!
  • Drink plenty of water – you can’t learn if you are dehydrated
  • Build in exercise so that you work off excess adrenalin
  • Check your Student Planner – it has lots of tips – check the page that defines the sorts of words you might find in an exam
  • Keep a revision diary – An opportunity to practice, self-test, clarify your uncertainties, reflect on the strategies you are using. It also keeps your revision together and will help you keep track of what you are revising
  • Use repetition – Repeat, Revise, Rehearse
  • Use mnemonics – this is one way to remember by association – could be an acronym, an acrostic, a rhyme that helps you to remember
  • Remember…We remember
    • 20% of what we read
    • 30% of what we see
    • 40% of what we hear
    • 50% of what we say
    • 60% of what we do
    • 90% of what we see, hear, say and do
SO…The more you combine these different ways of learning, the more effective your learning will be
  • Study is about DOING – Never just sit and read – You have to do something active because learning is an active process
  • What do you do if you can’t remember – Bring to mind anything that is associated with the missing information and allow the power of association to trigger your memory